July 16, 2010

Irons: Tips, tricks and what NOT to buy.

Posted in Sewing 101 tagged , , , , , at 4:59 pm by kdthreads

Every seamstress needs an iron that has the ability to steam or successfully NOT steam when you only want heat.  When my mother bought her first Rowenta iron back in 1997, I suddenly fell in love with ironing.  The generous weight pressed down on the garments with less effort, the steam shot was so powerful (it scared our Cocker Spaniel) that is could set stitches or remove wrinkles in just one pass with the iron.  It felt good to use and seemed to make ironing easier and anything that makes ironing at all enjoyable is worth every penny! 

That is the other element of Rowenta irons: pricey.  Imagine my delight when my mom made a gift basket out of a laundry basket with starch, lingerie bag, sizing, and hangers for my bridal shower, and tucked in the center was a Rowenta box!  I was thrilled to begin keeping house (or apartment) with my Mercedes-Benz of household appliances at my side. 

Well…not too long after my wedding, the Rowenta stopped working.  Around the same time, my mom’s Rowenta began spitting hot water any time it was plugged in (3 years after purchase.)  We both thought these irons would be the last we ever bought.  Somewhere in the last decade, my sister also bought and lost a Rowenta.  My mother purchased a replacement Rowenta, and it did not last long either.  You may be wondering if we are running some sort of pressing service that we are exhausting our irons so quickly, but I promise we are not! 

The iron my mother gave me was $99.99.  In our early marriage years, we did not have $100 to spend on anything, much less an iron.  When no irons showed up at the thrift store, I headed to Target where I figured I would by a Black and Decker or even some off-brand iron for $14 or so.  The cheapest iron only had one heat setting which is only useful if you are ironing nothing but linen.  Most people have a variety of fibers in their clothes, and a seamstress certainly needs a few options on her iron.  I found a Hamilton Beach for $19.99 that fit the bill; however, it was out of stock.  The next iron up was $44.99 and out of my budget.  I took a chance and asked an associate if there were any more in the stock room, but the answer was “no” since the iron was discontinued.  Aha!  I quickly haggled for a bargain on the shelf model and came out with a new iron for $10. 

The Hamilton Beach is no where near as heavy as a Rowenta, nor does it have the “power shot” steam feature, BUT I bought it 7 years ago and it is still working fine.  The moral of the story:

  • Look for an iron with at least 6 heat settings to ensure an actual variation in temperature.
  • In addition to steaming, make certain there is a way to turn this feature “off” as well.
  • A spray nozzle is a bonus, but a spray bottle can do the job.
  • If you can’t decide between two irons, choose the heavier one as it puts more weight on the fabric with less effort.
  • If you must own a Rowenta or other expensive brand, buy from QVC or any other company that backs up a product indefinitely.
  • Even if your cord swivels, buy an extension cord ($1.00) that will forever cleave to your iron.
  • Slowly invest in accessories like a tailor’s ham, sleeve board, Magic Sizing, and Steam-A-Seam to make the most use of your iron.  Buy a pressing cloth, or designate a piece of muslin. 
  • The key to efficient ironing is your ironing surface; do not settle for a wimpy little cover from Wal-Mart.  Seamlessly cover your board with as many old sheets, big towels, tablecloths, and curtains as you can manage.  Secure the layers under the board with rubber bands, safety pins or clothes pins.  The top layer can be attractive fabric of your choice!
  • Under all that padding, wrap the metal frame that makes the board in a smooth layer of tinfoil.  The foil will reflect the heat and moisture back up through the garment making the iron more powerful.
  • Keep a jug of Distilled Water or a recycled juice bottle with tap water near your iron.  No one wants to leave their iron unattended to run to the sink for water!  Keep your water in a cabinet or other dark area to prevent algae growth! 
  • Every few weeks, run white vinegar through your iron to clean any residue (of course be certain not to breathe in fumes or use your iron until all vinegar is rinsed through.)
  • Keep an old rag handy to frequently clean the iron’s surface.  You would be amazed at what happens to a white shirt when you were previously ironing black corduroy!

Do you have an iron you love?  Tell us about it in the comments section!

 


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2 Comments »

  1. sandy said,

    Ironing is my least favorite job. I don’t even know where my iron is presently. After reading your post, however, I feel like it might not be quite as onerous if I did it correctly! You sure do know a lot of stuff!

    • kdthreads said,

      Sandy,

      I am so glad the post encouraged you! That is exactly what I want this blog to be; a source of encouragement and empowerment for homemakers of all types. I have a favor to ask….as I am beginning my blog, I want more questions from readers. Whether it is wanting help with a project or a how-to for something specific (like how to put in a zipper) I want to start adding layers of content. I think that requests and comments from readers is a great way to get started!

      Happy Ironing,

      Katie


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